Daily Crunch: Chase and DoorDash deliver new co-branded credit card with loyalty rewards

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Have we told you lately that we love you? Well, we do. For ’tis March, and spring is almost here. Breathe in and check the smell of snow? Good heavens, what’s going on with this weather?

Enough of that, let’s March on with the tech news. — Christine and Haje

The TechCrunch Top 3

  • That’s some delicious credit: If you’re a fan of DoorDash and credit card rewards, the delivery giant now has its own co-branded credit card with Chase. There are indeed some nice perks that come with being a cardholder, but we’ll let Aisha tell you more.
  • Elon Musk’s favorite day: By the time this hits your inbox, this may have already happened, but today is Tesla Investor Day. Kirsten has your inside scoop on how to watch and what to expect.
  • Better late than never: Revolut’s annual report for 2021 is out, and while Romain writes that 2021 was a while ago, the report provided some exciting news for the company, including that it was the financial app’s first full year of profit. Pop open the champagne!

Startups and VC

Rad Power Bikes is focused on popularizing electric utility bikes for the consumer market. Rebecca reports that the company launched its next-generation RadRunner 3 Plus e-bike today alongside a host of new cargo accessories that will make it easier for riders to cart along pets or haul groceries as they ride.

Apropos e-bikes: The e-bike market in America is getting a brave new player. Off the back of its $7.4 million Series A funding close, Velotric announced this week that it will be doubling down on U.S. expansion with its privately owned e-bikes, Rita reports.

Another fistful for you, with less bike content than you might expect from the intro above.

Dear Sophie: What are my options for changing my status from an L-1 visa?

Image Credits: Bryce Durbin/TechCrunch

Dear Sophie,

I started working for my current employer on STEM-OPT, but I’ve lost out in the H-1B lottery four times. Thankfully, my employer transferred me to an international office, and I am now coming back to the U.S. on an L-1 visa.

I’ve heard many complaints from my classmates about not being able to switch employers on an L-1 visa. I don’t see myself staying at my employer for six more years, which is the estimated time until I can get a green card based on my employer’s internal policy.

What are my options for changing my immigration status so I can work at a startup in the U.S. within a year or two?

— Tenacious Transferee

Three more from the TC+ team:

TechCrunch+ is our membership program that helps founders and startup teams get ahead of the pack. You can sign up here. Use code “DC” for a 15% discount on an annual subscription!

Big Tech Inc.

If you’re looking for an enjoyable read and a reason to let out a scream of eek, look no further than Zack’s article today. Zack spoke with an unnamed former Microsoft executive who had to jump through a lot of hoops to get his life back in order after his address was changed at the post office.

Kyle has a trio of stories about — what else? — OpenAI. Two are some new features, including Whisper API for text-to-speech transcription and translation and API for ChatGPT, while the third reports on OpenAI no longer using customer data to train its models by default.

Now, on with the show:

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