The most watched movies and TV of the week are a kaleidoscope of mystery

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So, what’s everyone been watching this week? Hmmmm?

Just to get a sense of what everyone’s streaming, we’ve used data from streaming aggregator Reelgood, which gathers viewership numbers from hundreds of streaming services in the U.S. and UK. Each week, the most streamed TV shows and movies come down to a few elements — sheer buzz, a big finale, smart marketing, star power, critical acclaim, or word-of-mouth that leads uninterested people to finally watch it out of spite.

But just because a lot of people are watching something doesn’t make it…good. Here they are, the 10 most streamed TV shows and movies of the week, where to watch them, and what Mashable critics thought.


Credit: John Wilson / Netflix

The knives didn’t stay in that cutlery drawer for long, as the second instalment of Rian Johnson’s murder mystery comedy has arrived. In Glass Onion: A Knives Out Mystery, the sequel to Knives Out, the world’s greatest detective, Benoit Blanc (Daniel Craig), finds himself embroiled in another complex whodunnit on a lavish private Greek island, owned by party- and puzzle-loving billionaire Elon Musk Miles Bron (Edward Norton).

Amid an annual reunion of Bron’s collection of pals — model Birdie Jay (Kate Hudson) and her long-suffering assistant Peg (Jessica Henwick), Connecticut governor Claire Debella (Kathryn Hahn), scientist Lionel Toussaint (Leslie Odom Jr.), and YouTuber Duke Cody (Dave Bautista) and his girlfriend Whiskey (Madelyn Cline) — there are more than a few secrets that might find their way out, especially with the arrival of Bron’s former business partner Andi Brand (Janelle Monáe). If you’re after a fun, smart, celebrity-filled mystery to break out the popcorn for, look deep into the Glass Onion. And while you might see all those cameos in real time, you’ll never see that twisty ending coming. — Shannon Connellan, UK Editor

What we thought: In his follow-up to Knives Out, Johnson has presented a puzzle box sequel, Glass Onion, that’s phenomenal, fun, gorgeous, and absolutely thrilling. — Kristy Puchko, Film Editor

How to watch: Glass Onion: A Knives Out Mystery is now streaming on Netflix.(opens in a new tab)

2. Yellowstone

A man in a cowboy hat walks away from a helicopter.
Taylor Sheridan’s western drama is into its fifth season.
Credit: Peacock

With Season 5 landing in November, Kevin Costner-led Western Yellowstone certainly has plenty of material to binge. Created by Taylor Sheridan and John Lindan, the drama follows John Dutton (Costner) and his family of ranchers in Montana. The show hasn’t always been beloved by critics (the first season, in particular, got a very mixed reception) but it is undeniably popular. — Sam Haysom, Deputy UK Editor

How to watch: Yellowstone(opens in a new tab) is streaming now on Peacock.(opens in a new tab)

3. 1923

A woman in early 20th century America sits beside a hay bale.

Credit: Emerson Miller/Paramount+

If everyone’s watching Yellowstone, they’re also watching this one, The next instalment of the Dutton family story, 1923 brings in a serious cast, with Helen Mirren and Harrison Ford leading the series as Cara and Jacob Dutton. The series examines America during the early 20th century in the lead up to the Great Depression, as drought and illness roamed across the plains. With the end of Prohibition ahead, the series explores a significant time in history.— S.C.

How to watch: 1923 is now streaming on Paramount+.(opens in a new tab)

Three people stand with their groceries in a supermarket.

Credit: Netflix

Adam Driver, Don Cheadle, and Greta Gerwig join forces in Netflix’s White Noise, a whirling comedy-horror-drama blend that will have you totally questioning your life. Based on the novel written by Don DeLillo, Noah Baumbach’s White Noise traces a modern blended family who is thrown into the midst of an apocalyptic disaster, testing their survival skills on the spot. While they manage to barely escape obstacles unscathed, the ragtag group never fails to remember that they’re a family first — which means bickering, joking, and always asking the world’s most pertinent questions. (Well? Do sheep have lashes, yes or no?!)* — Kyle McWilliams, Entertainment Intern

What we thought: There’s a lot to admire in Baumbach’s White Noise. The earnest performance of his leads blends seamlessly with the boldly quirky portrayals from the supporting cast…The filmmaker’s branching into horror and broad comedy is refreshing and even thrilling. The dialogue not only boasts biting banter, but also a barrage of colliding conversations, where the point is not to process every line but perhaps be swept up in the sheer force of its noise and chaotic ideas. Yet amid all this conflict, chaos, and conversation, there’s frustratingly little flow. — K.P.

How to watch: White Noise is now streaming on Netflix.(opens in a new tab)

A girl with braids holds her hand up to click.
Snaps for Jenna Ortega.
Credit: Netflix

Tim Burton’s chart-topping Netflix series sends the macabre teen sibling of the Addams Family, Wednesday (played by the extremely talented Jenna Ortega), off to Nevermore Academy, a boarding school for outcasts. Home to werewolves, sirens, gorgons, and all kinds of spooky students (including alumni Morticia and Gomez Addams, played by Catherine Zeta-Jones and Luis Guzmán), Nevermore is run by the weirdly upbeat Principal Weems (Gwendoline Christie). But there’s a monster and a major mystery afoot — and Wednesday’s on the case.* — S.C.

What we thought: Wednesday is a creepy, riotously fun teen mystery series that sees Burton capitalising on the teen Addams member in his signature spooky style. — S.C.

How to watch: Wednesday is now streaming on Netflix.(opens in a new tab)

6. The Menu

A chef and a person in a dress stare at each other.

Credit: Searchlight Pictures

Usually the only terrifying thing about boujie fine dining experiences is the price tag attached to them. And perhaps the occasional food item that grosses you out. Directed by Mark Mylod, The Menu puts a new spin on fear-inducing gastronomy with what appears to be a murderous chef played by a very sinister looking Ralph Fiennes, and a load of unsuspecting restaurant guests who think they’re all in for nothing more than a night of haute cuisine. Naturally, they all get more than they bargained for. And, no, we don’t mean free dessert.

Anya Taylor-Joy and Nicholas Hoult play a couple who travel to the high-end restaurant, which handily happens to be on a coastal island (handy because no one can hear you screaming, perhaps). Shocks and surprises await them, and the other guests, at their foodie retreat. Anyone fancy eating at home, this evening? And maybe forever?* — Rachel Thompson, Features Editor

How to watch: The Menu (opens in a new tab)is now streaming on HBO Max.

A group of people stand around a warehouse-like space looking at the same thing.

Credit: Netflix

Netflix’s Kaleidoscope is a heist series with a twist: the series is not only out of chronological order but the streaming service itself is claiming to serve viewers “randomly” ordered episodes — except the finale. It’s not exactly as choose-your-own-adventure as Netflix’s truly interactive Black Mirror: Bandersnatch or Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt: Kimmy vs. The Reverend but the playfulness here lies in what order you watch the series.

Written by Eric Garcia, Kaleidoscope hinges around one major heist by master thief Leo Pap (Giancarlo Esposito) and his team of criminals, but it spans 25 years — from 24 years before the heist to six months after it. What are we robbing? Only the most secure vault in the East Coast of the U.S., requiring not one but a flurry of jobs to pull off. And of course, the motive isn’t just about getting rich, it’s about getting even. The series, Netflix says, is “loosely inspired” by the curious case of the stock and bond certificates sitting in an underground Wall Street vault that were reportedly damaged by flooding in Hurricane Sandy in 2012.* — S.C.

How to watch: Kaleidoscope is now streaming on Netflix.(opens in a new tab)

An actor dressed as a US pilot stands looking stern at sundown.

Credit: Paramount Pictures, Skydance And Jerry Bruckheimer Films

“GREAT BAAAALLS OF FIIIRE!” This film won’t quit. Set 30 years after the original, the huge sequel to Top Gun sees Tom Cruise returning to his famous role of Pete “Maverick” Mitchell. He’s now training the latest batch of unruly, elite naval aviators, including Bradley “Rooster” Bradshaw (Miles Teller), the son of his best friend, Nick “Goose” Bradshaw, who died during an op in the first film. Also returning is Val Kilmer as Tom “Iceman” Kazansky, who gets one of the most poignant scenes in the film. — S.C.

What we thought: Nostalgia is one thing, but rerunning the same plotlines, resuscitating the same archetypes, and coasting on the relics of pop culture past makes for a movie that feels sanitized instead of sensational, safe instead of sexy. Essentially, this franchise has lost that loving feeling. And with it gone (gone, gone), so too is a bit of the thrill. — K.P.

How to watch: Top Gun: Maverick is now streaming on Paramount+.(opens in a new tab)

Two people hide with their backs to a wall, one peering around.

Credit: Netflix

British Netflix limited series Treason explores the trials, tribulations, and treasonous actions of a MI6 agent, who finds himself taking over as Chief after his predecessor was poisoned. Created and written by Matt Charman (known for espionage thriller Bridge of Spies), the new series sees protagonist Adam Lawrence (played by Daredevil‘s Charlie Cox) as the torn hero, assuming high levels of responsibility within the UK’s foreign intelligence service and grappling with a presumably seedy past. Treason also stars Olga Kurylenko as Kara, a Russian spy who Lawrence shares history with, and Oona Chaplin as Maddy, Lawrence’s wife.* — Meera Navlakha, Culture Reporter

How to watch: Treason is now streaming on Netflix.(opens in a new tab)

A man sits in a dark house while another man looks through the window.

Credit: Searchlight Pictures

Lifelong friends Pádraic (Colin Farrell) and Colm (Brendan Gleeson) sit at the core of The Banshees of Inisherin, Martin McDonagh’s celebrated comedy. Set on an island off the west coast of Ireland, the film hinges around Colm’s decision to end the friendship. As Pádraic’s sister Siobhán (Kerry Condon) and neighbour Dominic (Barry Keoghan) attempt to patch their relationship up, Colm throws down quite the ultimatum. — S.C.

What we thought: Simply put, The Banshees of Inisherin is a fucked-up kind of fun that’ll leave you chuckling, heartsick, and a wee bit anxious. Don’t miss it. — K.P. 

How to watch: The Banshees of Inisherin is now streaming on Disney+.(opens in a new tab)

* Asterisks indicate the writeup is adapted from another Mashable article.

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